Is Your Business Prepared for the Next Prolonged Power Failure?

Power Failure, blackout
March 21, 2019

By: Tilo McAlister


Severe power failures have the ability to last days, even weeks for some - causing extensive damage to businesses that aren’t prepared with a standby power generator.

Remember the Northeast blackout of 2003? (How could anyone forget?)

Something as simple as a power line droping into foliage led to the collapse of the entire electrical grid, causing the largest blackout in the history of North America.

An estimated 10 million Ontario residents and 45 million people in eight U.S. states were affected by the event, which also cost an estimated total of $6 billion in damages, and was responsible for at least 11 deaths. Most people went more than two full days without power, with some “blacked out” for a week or two.

It goes without saying that prolonged power outages can lead to substantial financial losses for every kind of business or industry. These costs can come from a variety of factors like idle labor and reputational damage, as well as physical damage to equipment and goods.

The cost of no power is greater than the cost of ongoing power

According to the Blackout Tracker Canada Annual Report 2017, the average total cost per minute of an unplanned power outage for a data center increased from $7,908 in 2013 to $8,851 in 2017. The largest expense of an outage was found to be business disruption, next to lost revenue and end user productivity, IT productivity, detection, recovery, ex-post activities and equipment.

Unfortunately, the incidence of power failures won’t be slowing down any time soon. A Climate Central research report shows that there has been a tenfold increase in major (affecting more than 50,000 customer homes or businesses) power outages between the mid-1980s and 2012.

It’s extremely important to ensure that your establishment, big or small, will be prepared for the next power failure. And thankfully, there’s a simple way for prudent business owners to secure their operations and keep their finances safe: by purchasing a commercial power generator.

Investing in emergency backup power by buying a used generator is an excellent decision that can be made feasible for any business.

Our experts at T&T Power Group can help you choose the right used generator for sale in Canada for your facility, and will be available around the clock for customer support and maintenance services.

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